ICYMI: Junk Insurance Pushed by Rosendale Forcing People to Pay for Lifesaving Treatments

Rachel Prevost2020, News, Republicans, Rosendale

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Thursday, June 25, 2020

CONTACT
[email protected]

ICYMI: Junk Insurance Pushed by Rosendale Forcing People to Pay for Lifesaving Treatments

State Auditor Has Pushed Junk Insurance in Response to Pandemic
 

Helena, MT – A new report reveals that many consumers have been forced to pay for their own lifesaving treatment under short-term junk insurance plans. As the COVID-19 pandemic was taking hold, Matt Rosendale continued to push junk insurance in direct response to concerns over coronavirus, despite the fact that “not all short-term plans may cover testing for COVID-19,” and that the plans could “reject Montanans who have pre-existing health conditions.” Rosendale himself refused to say whether he’d buy a junk insurance plan for his own family.

Rosendale’s history of attacking protections for pre-existing conditions is welldocumented. Maryland Matt is also continuing his attacks on Medicaid expansion, which currently covers 90,000 Montanans across the state, has created thousands of jobs, and has proven to be a lifeline for rural hospitals and the communities they support. 

“Pushing junk health plans in response to a pandemic is more than just disingenuous — it’s downright predatory,” said MDP Communications Director Nathan Stein. “Now more than ever, Montanans are depending on elected officials to defend access to quality health care, not push them onto sham insurance plans. Maryland Matt should be ashamed of himself.”

Wall Street Journal: Shorter-Term Health Plans Force Many to Pay for Lifesaving Treatments, Report Finds
By: Stephanie Armour 

Highlights:

“Many consumers have been forced to pay for their own lifesaving treatment under shorter-term health plans that have seen enrollment jumps since the Trump administration relaxed restrictions on them, according to a report to be released Thursday by House Democrats on the Energy and Commerce Committee.

“The short-term plans don’t have to comply with the 2010 Affordable Care Act, so they often exclude coverage for pre-existing conditions and charge women more for the same coverage, the yearlong investigation found.”

“In its review of consumer complaints against insurers selling short-term plans, the committee reported that it found numerous examples of patients who were denied coverage for treatment, leaving consumers on the hook for hundreds of thousands of dollars.”

“The committee’s investigation found that, on average, less than half of the premium dollars collected from consumers are spent on medical care, unlike ACA-compliant individual market plans, which are required to spend at least 80% of all premium dollars on health care. The rest of the money generally goes to administrative, overhead and marketing costs.”
 

###

Share this Post